13: Medical & Healthcare

Overview

Medical care throughout France is very good and quite inexpensive. The World Health Organization, in its year 2000 survey, classed France as first amongst more than 150 countries. The major criteria in the survey was not just state-of-the-art technology but, more so, easy access. This means principally the extent of coverage both geographically and insurance-wise. In fact, in means also the lower cost of consulting a GP, which is often a barrier to many people. Consulting your GP is key to Preventive Medicine and a tenet of French health care; Remedial Medicine being far more expensive.

Unlike Paris, where an American Hospital and British Hospital can be found (both addresses are included under “Other Medical Needs” in this chapter), Toulouse has only French medical facilities. (The Toulouse hospital, actually located in Purpan, however, was recently cited as the best in France.) Family doctors, as well as specialists and supporting medical personnel (equivalent to those of your home country) are available here. Some doctors make house calls, as do nurses and laboratory personnel when so requested by the doctor. Dentists in France are generally well trained and thorough. The medical practitioners listed in this chapter are English-speaking, (their fluency ranges from excellent to acceptable).

Have as much medical history as possible on hand for all members of the family. Some French doctors and hospitals do not keep health records on file over the long term. The patient is given, and is expected to retain, all medical documents, x-rays, and prescriptions for future reference.

It is wise to read, also below, our chapter on Doctor’s fees, titled “Fee Schedule”. Doctors chose whether they will apply state health care insurance mandated fees, or higher fees that they fix themselves. Be sure you know which kind of doctor you are seeing before asking for a consultation. Simply ask if the doctor is “Conventionée”. If not, they practice their own fee schedule.

Under new rules, you will be expected to select a GP and will be associated with that doctor. If you do not select a GP, expect to pay a higher consultation fee. Remember, unlike other countries, in France you will pay a certain percentage of medical fees unless it is a matter of grave illness. Your GP will make that decision. S/he will also route you to other specialists for either further examination or treatment. These practitioners will report directly back to your selected GP, by writing, their conclusions. You are expected, then, to consult with your selected GP for further treatment. It is therefore wise to select at GP. Should you want, you can change your selection at any time.

NB: For a list of GPs (Médecins généralistes) as well as other health practitioners, see listing below. This list is NOT a recommendation. Those listed have simply indicated a willingness to treat English speaking patients.

French National Health Insurance (Sécurité Sociale)

Under the French system, the individual is free to consult the health professional of their choice: médecin généraliste (general practitioner), spécialiste (specialist), dentiste (dentist), laboratoire (laboratory), infirmier (nurse), kinésithérapeute (physiotherapist), etc.. A gynécologue (gynecologist) is often the primary care physician for women, as visits are encouraged on an annual or semi-annual basis.

There are two types of health care practitioner, one being conventionné, meaning that they have agreed to accept fee schedules established by the French national health system or non-conventionné, meaning they set thier own fees. If you are established in France with a permit de séjour(resident permit) you may be covered by national health care insurance. You should then request a Carte Vitale, which you employ whilst paying fees to GPs/Specialists who are conventionné — and which will be not totally reimbursed to you by the national healh insurance system (CPAM). For total reimbursement of fees, you must subscribe personally to a mutualized insurance scheme – a sort of “top-up” insurance. This is private insurance and there are many such policies available. Be sure to shop around.

National Health Insurance typically reimburses between 50 and 70% of expenses, unless they result from an accident. If the latter, then by your GP’s authorization, they will be reimbursed at 100%. Top-up insurance exists from private companies (see Mutualized Insurance below).

Pharmaceutical costs will be partially reimbursed as well if obtained by a doctor’s prescription.

See below for further detailed explanation of how medical fees are reimbursed.

Mutualized Insurance

Since the French NHI (National Health Insurance) will not pay all expenses, many take on additional private insurance. There are many such offerings on the market, sometimes they are very confusing. Which is why, if you are generally of good health, think twice about their utility. It might be cheaper for you to “insure yourself”. That is, for the 100 to 150€ per month that this top-up health insurance will cost, that is between 1200 and 1800€ per year, it might be advisable to assume this risk yourself. Only you can know if the money is worth it.

General Health Conditions in Greater Toulouse

The general level of community sanitation is adequate, although the handling of meats and other foods in the open markets may not be as strictly regulated as in your home country. The water in Toulouse is safe to drink; bottled water is just preferred by most. NOTE: Meat is often served very rare in restaurants. If you are wary of eating meat that may be almost raw, you can ask for your meat to be cooked bien cuite (well done), which is equivalent to medium in the US and medium-rare in England.

There are no specific health hazards although upper respiratory infections occur frequently. It is thought that this is due to pollution levels due to car density. Pollen levels in Toulouse-center are extremely high from April through the end of July. Children in particular are susceptible to chronic colds, bronchitis, sinusitis, and sore throats.

Doctors and Specialists

NOTE: Doctors do not generally have sterile supplies in their offices. For emergency care, (minor injuries, stitches, etc.), go directly to the Service des Urgences (Emergency Room) of the nearest clinique (private clinic) or hôpital (public hospital).

As mentioned in our Overview, you will be expected to sign-up with a primary-care General Practitioner, or GP. This individual (called a Medecin Generaliste in French) is key. They will undertake a preliminary investigation of your illness, perhaps asking you to take either blood tests, or echo grams or x-rays or even an IRM; all of which are conducted by specialists with their own premises. If necessary, they may refer you to a specialist physician for further consultations.

As stated previously, under the French system, the individual is free to consult the health professional of their choice, (i.e. a gynécologue(gynecologist) is classified as a specialist, but is often the primary care physician for women). While appointments must be made in advance for specialists (pediatricians, dermatologists, etc.), most généralistes (general practitioners) have consulting hours on a first-come-first-serve basis. Since many doctors do not have receptionists, the clientele are very mindful of the sequence of arrival in the office and your turn will be respected. Any médecin (doctor) will see someone without an appointment in case of emergency.

A doctor’s cabinet (office) in France is somewhat different than might be experienced elsewhere. Smaller offices are usually staffed only by the doctor and, in some cases, a receptionist. There is usually no nurse to assist the doctor, who will examine you alone. Many employ a Call Answering service that will make your appointment. Larger offices or partnerships generally have a receptionist and a medical assistant.

The cabinet will generally consist of a separate salle d’attente (waiting area) and consultation / examination room. The examination area is often just a medical table in the corner of the room. Courtesy gowns are rarely provided, so do not be alarmed if the doctor discusses your medical situation while you are only half-dressed, or even naked. (If embarassed, just ask to put your cloths back on before further discussion.) During the appointment you can expect to discuss your condition and any problems or questions you may have. You will not feel rushed during the consultation; the doctor will take a genuine interest in you and your well being.

At the end of a visit, the doctor will provide a prescription to buy any necessary items (vaccinations, ointment, bandages, etc.) that are to be brought to the next appointment, for the treatment. The doctor will provide the required arrêt de travail (medical leave certificate) for insurance compensation in case of absences from work due to illness, maternity or work-related accident. When laboratory tests and x-rays are needed, a prescription will be provided which is to be taken to the laboratoire d’analyse médicale (lab) or centre de radiologie (x-ray center) of your choice. It is not usually necessary to make an appointment when visiting a lab or x-ray center. Payment may be made when you return to pick up the results, generally ready in 2 to 4 days, however, if payment is made at the time the work is done, the results will be sent to you and to the doctor by mail or fax, upon request. Call the doctor afterwards to inquire about the results.

Doctors’ fees are paid by the patient (check or cash) at the time services are rendered. Most doctors are equiped to accept the Carte Vitale (medical smartcard) which eliminates the need to send the feuille de soins (medical treatment form) to the CPAM – Caisse Primaire d’Assurance Maladie(Sécurité Sociale center) assigned to you by the Sécurité Sociale (French National Health Care Service). If the doctor is not connected to the Sésam-Vitale computer system, (or if you are not covered by the Sécurité Sociale), a form (feuille de soins) will be provided for you to submit to the CPAM where necessary for reimbursement. (See “Feuille de soins” and “Sécurité Sociale” near the end of this chapter.)

Fee schedule

Doctors’ fees fall into one of the four following categories, a schedule of which is usually posted in the waiting room or reception area:

Médecins Conventionnés Secteur 1: This is a National Health Service doctor who applies fixed rates. Doctors can be general practitioners or specialists. The fee per visit (as of today, 10 March 2011) is 23.00€ for a general practitioner. If you are a member of the French national health system this, and other such fees, are reimbursed between 50 and 70% – depending upon the type of medical intervention is necessary (laboratory tests, surgery, etc.)

  • Médecins Conventionnés Honoraires Libres Secteur 2: These are doctors who are allowed to fix their own fees (often young specialists who have recently set up practice). Their fees are higher than Secteur 1 but remain within a reasonable bracket. Sécurité Sociale does not reimburse fees exceeding the fixed rate. It is wise to confirm the fee before service. You will be reimbursed only the 21.00 Euros allowed in Secteur 1 fees.
  • Médecins Conventionnés Avec Droit à Dépassement: These doctors have acquired a good reputation and have consequently been accorded the droit à dépassement (right to charge higher fees). However, the Sécurité Sociale does not usually reimburse fees exceeding the maximum fixed rates for Médecins Conventionnés Secteur 1. You will find that it is the present habit of many clinics and hospitals to surpass the authorized limit in terms of fees. Often, this will arise in the form of a bill that you will receive after having been given one that is reimbursed directly by the national health system with your Carte Verte. You are not obliged to pay these fees, since you were not advised beforehand that they were part of the service rendered. Consumer law provides that all fees for services rendered must be specified before the service is rendered.• Médecins Hors Convention ou Non-Conventionnés: These are private doctors. Some doctors who work in hôpitaux (public hospitals) are allowed to see a patient en consultation (as an out-patient) at the hospital. Such doctors do so in their separate capacity as Médecins Hors Convention ou Non-Conventionnés, so be sure to confirm the rate you will be charged when making the appointment. Fees can be extremely high and Sécurité Sociale reimburses almost nothing. (Ditto regarding the extra-fees that are sent, as noted above.)

    Visites à domicile (House Calls)

House calls (visite à domicile) are standard practice in France for most family practitioners and the doctor reserves a part the day to make house calls. Expect to pay a slight frais de déplacement (displacement  fee) in addition to the usual doctor’s fee. Specialists generally don’t make house calls, the exeption being certain pediatricians. Weekend or holiday house calls are made by the médecin de garde (doctor on call). The names of the doctors on call are listed in La Dépêche, (a local daily newspaper). The commissariat (local police) can also provide the name and location of themédecin de garde on duty at the time. Weekend house-call  fees are much higher than weekdays.

Emergenices

Emergency (ER) services are available at all Public Hospitals.You will be asked for your Carte Verte before entry, meaning you should be subscribed to the national health service (“La Sécu“)

CHIRURGIENS DENTISTS (DENTISTS)

Dentists in France are generally well trained and thorough. However, due to differences in technique and practice, it is suggested that you have the dentist fully explain the procedures that are being recommended. For procedures such as cavities and root canals, expect the work to be done over the course of several visits. When making the appointment, specify if you wish to have a détartrage (tartar-removing cleaning) or fluor (floride) treatment. For orthodontia already in progress, check with your home country orthodontist before leaving for France about what follow-up work will be required during your absence. The book, Doctors the World Over, may help locate dentists in France who are using the same system as your home country orthodontist.

Most ordinary dental work will be reimbursed by the Sécurité Sociale. However, implants and crowns will not. They are covered, however, by Mutualized Insurance policies.

Prescription Drugs or Homeopathic Medicines (Medicaments)

Because of French regulations, medications used in France may differ from those available in your home country. Medicines prescribed in your home country may or may not be sold in France, or they might not be the medication of choice for your symptoms. What is considered a “prescription drug” in one country may be an over-the-counter medication elsewhere, or vice-versa.

Medication comes in various forms such as comprimés (pills or caplets), comprimés secables (scored pills or caplets), comprimés orodispersibles or comprimés à délitement buccal (tablets to be dissolved in the mouth), poudre or sachets (sachets of powder), liquide (liquid), gouttes (drops), gélules (capsules), ampoules (liquid-filled capsules) or as suppositoires (anal suppositories) or ovules (vaginal suppositories). (Suppositoires are commonly prescribed for children of all ages. For those opposed to suppositories, French doctors and pharmacists are understanding and will help find an equivalent drug in another form.) Watch for expiration dates printed by law on all drug packages.

Aspirin is not available in pill form in France; it is sold in a powder or tablet to be dissolved in water before ingesting. Paracétamol (acetaminophen, as found in Tylenol) is available as comprimés (pills or caplets), comprimés orodispersibles (dissolving tablets) and suppositoires (suppositories). Ibuprofen (ibuprofen, as found in Advil) is available as liquide (liquid) and comprimés (pills or caplets).

PHARMACISTS AND PHARMACIES

There is an abundance of pharmacies in greater Toulouse, easily recognizable by the large green cross flashing over their door. Local pharmacists are well trained, willing and capable of recommending over-the-counter drugs, and trained to provide First Aid in case of injury or accident. They can supply a list of neighborhood nurses or laboratoires d’analyses (medical labs) or even advise whether the mushrooms found in the woods are edible or toxic. Most pharmacie personnel speak some English, so don’t be afraid to ask.

ALL medications, even aspirin, are only available in a pharmacy. Baby products and personal hygiene items are found in most pharmacies, but are less expensive in supermarkets. Crème de tartre (cream of tarter), bicarbonate de soude (baking soda) and Canderel (apartame) are sold in pharmacies and/or supermarkets. Calcium in an effervescent form is also available in pharmacies and is very good for those wishing to take an easily assimilated calcium supplement (Calcium Sandoz Forte provides 500 mg per tablet).

Emergency needs

Pharmacists are trained and permitted by law to perform First Aid in case of injury or accident. On Sundays, nights and holidays the name and address of the local pharmacie de garde (on-duty pharmacy) is posted in the door or window of all pharmacies. The commissariat (local police) can also provide the name and location of the pharmacie de garde on duty at the time. Medicines purchased on Sundays, nights and holidays cost slightly more than if purchased during regular business hours, but reimbursement is based on the normal purchase price. (See “Reimbursement of medication costs”, below.)

In Toulouse (near Place Wilson), an all-night pharmacy is open 20:00-08:00:
• Pharmacie de Nuit, 70-76 allées Jean Jaurès (entrance on rue Arnaud Vidal), 31000 TOULOUSE, (Tel: 05 61 62 38 05)

Reimbursement of Medication Costs

ALL medications, (even aspirin), are only available in a pharmacy and payment must be made at the time of purchase. Reimbursement is based on the normal purchase price and will not cover the additional cost of medicines purchased outside of regular business hours.

The Sécurité Sociale (French National Health Care system) covers a percentage of all medical costs including reimbursable prescriptions. Most French employees pay into a mutuelle (supplementary insurance) which covers the remaining cost. Those covered by the French system are issued a Carte Vitale (medical smartcard) which enables pharmacists to extract all the information necessary for payment of any reimbursable items included on the prescription. If not in possession of either the card or the information necessary for automatic coverage at the time of purchase, you must pay the full costs of the prescribed items and submit the paperwork for reimbursement yourself. If purchases of reimbursed items have been made at the pharmacy in the past, the information may be stored in the pharmacy’s computer and can be used even if you have forgotten the Carte Vitale. (For information concerning eligibility, reimbursement, the Carte Vitale, etc., see “Sécurité Sociale” near the end of this chapter.) In summary:

  • If COVERED by the French sécurité sociale AND by a French mutuelle, all reimbursable prescribed medication is covered 100%. Automatic payment may be made with the Carte Vitale. If not in possession of the Carte Vitale or of all the necessary information, (and if the pharmacy does not have the information on their computer), you must pay the full costs of the prescribed items and submit the paperwork for reimbursement yourself. (You will be expected to pay 100% of non-reimbursable prescribed medication not covered by the Sécurité Sociale and mutuelle.)
  • If COVERED by the French sécurité sociale BUT NOT by a French mutuelle, all reimbursable prescribed medication is partially covered. Automatic payment may be made with the Carte Vitale. If not in possession of the Carte Vitale or of all the necessary information, (and if the pharmacy does not have the information on their computer), you must pay the full costs of the prescribed items and submit the paperwork for reimbursement yourself. (You will be expected to pay the uncovered portion of reimbursable prescribed medication as well as 100% of non-reimbursable prescribed medication not covered by the Sécurité Sociale.)
  • If NOT COVERED by the French system (neither the Sécurité Sociale nor a French mutuelle), you must pay the full costs of all prescribed medication and submit the paperwork for reimbursement to your insurance company yourself.NOTE: Some prescribed medication, such as birth control pills, iare NOT reimbursable. Aspirin or other pain medication is reimbursable if prescribed by a doctor, but is not reimbursed if purchased without a prescription. See “Sécurité Sociale Reimbursement” near the end of this chapter.

HOSPITALS

In France, a “hôpital” (hospital) is a State-run public institution, and a “hôpital privé” (private hospital) or “clinique” (clinic) is privately run. This is no indication of the quality of service rendered. (In 2008, CHU Purpan, a public hospital in Toulouse, was ranked the number one hospital in France.) The Sécurité Sociale will cover a larger portion of the costs incurred in a hôpital than in a clinique.Your particular medical problem may dictate the hospital or clinic your doctor will recommend. The preface “CHU”, which stands for “Centre Hospitalier Universitaire” (such as CHU Rangeuil or CHU Purpan, in Toulouse) indicates a teaching hospital. Patients at teaching hospitals might be seen by an intern, but will at some point be seen by the professeur (senior doctor); you may also request to be seen by a senior doctor. Although the Sécurité Sociale covers the care provided in most clinics, treatment in a clinique non-conventionnée is not reimbursable. The doctor who recommended the clinique non-conventionnée should be able to provide the name of an alternative institution upon request.

If the patient is a child, one parent is allowed to stay with the child at all times. A lit portable (rollaway bed) may be provided for a small charge, and a television can be rented for the room, by the day or week.

Doctors and surgeons at State hospitals work in teams. The doctor that initially examines the patient may not perform the surgery, and the surgeon may not see the patient post-op. Make sure to schedule surgery based on your own surgeon’s availability. After surgery, your own doctor or surgeon may or may not be part of the follow up team during the stay in the hospital.

With the exception of emergency cases, a medical prescription stating the necessity of hospitalization must be supplied before admittance to a hospital. On arrival at the hospital, the patient will also be asked if they are “pris(e) en charge” (covered under the French National Health Care system), and if they have a mutuelle or complémentaire (supplementary insurance). Patients covered by the Sécurité Sociale should supply either their Carte Vitale, the document issued with it, or all the necessary information. Although under normal circumstances hospitals will be able to access the information with the Sésam-Vitale computer network using only the name of the person covered, it is always best to be well prepared to avoid being required to advance what might be a large sum of money. (See “Sécurité Sociale-Carte Vitale” near the end of this chapter.) If not covered by the Sécurité Sociale, a E111 form (for EEC/European Union nationals) or medical insurance card (for non-EEC nationals) must be provided for admittance. (See the vocabulary at the end of this chapter for the types of questions asked during a hospital stay.)

Some doctors working in hospitals are allowed to treat private patients on the premises, in their separate capacity as Médecins Hors Convention ou Non-Conventionnés. Fees will be higher, so it is wise to confirm their rates beforehand. (It is also possible to consult such doctors on a public basis; however, one or more interns will assist during the visit.) For in-hospital private treatment, the doctor’s fees and the private room supplement must be paid separately.

Although very flexible in clinics, visiting hours in hospitals are usually 13:00 20:00. Children under fifteen are not usually allowed.

Groupe Hospitalier (Toulouse Public Hospitals with Emergency Services)
• CHU La Grave, Place Lange (Tel: 05 61 77 78 33)
• CHU Purpan, Place du Docteur Baylac (Tel: 05 61 77 22 33)
• CHU Rangueil , Avenue Jean Poulhes (Tel: 05 61 32 25 33)
• CHU G.Marchant (psychiatric hospital), Rte d’Espagne Tel: 05 61 43 77 77
• Hôpital Joseph Ducuing, 15 rue de Varsovie Tel: 05 61 77 34 00
• Centre Claudius Regaud, 20-24 rue du Pont St. Pierre Tel: 05 61 42 15 10 (specialized in cancer therapy)

Hôpitaux privés et cliniques (Private Hospitals and Clinics)

Most people who choose to go to a clinic do so because their specialist works out of one. The patient is guaranteed to have his/her doctor for pre-operation consultation, the operation itself and post-op consultation. Births, however, are generally performed by the OB-GYN on duty at the time. You may be asked to bring your own towel, soap, and rectal thermometer. Although they provide gowns for the operation, you may want to bring your own for post-op. Clinics are more service oriented, allowing a family member to stay overnight in some cases (especially for children). Although Sécurité Sociale covers care provided in most clinics, treatment in a clinique non-conventionnée is not reimbursable. The doctor who recommended the clinique non-conventionnée should be able to provide the name of an alternative institution upon request.

For other medical needs

• Private clinics outside of Toulouse-centre:
Clinique des Cèdres, Château d’Alliez, 31700 CORNEBARRIEU (Tel: 05 62 13 31 31; emergencies: 05 62 13 30 30)
Clinique des Pyrénées, 10 chemin Cournaudis, 31770 COLOMIERS (Tel 05 61 15 32 00)
• American Hospital (in Paris), 63 boulevard Victor Hugo, 92200 NEUILLY SUR SEINE (Tel: 01 46 41 25 25)
Hôpital Franco Britannique (Paris), 3 rue Barbès, LEVALLOIS PERRET (Tel: 01 46 39 22 22)
• Associations For The Handicapped: See “Toulouse Pratique” (Chapter 27) for a complete list of organizations.
• Medical equipment: MPM (Midi-Pyrenées Médical), 33 route de Bayonne, TOULOUSE (Tel: 05 61 49 87 96)

EMERGENCY SERVICES

The quickest way to get help in any emergency is to pick up the telephone and DIAL 18. When calling from a fixed phone, the call goes into a computer and connects you to the Fire Department in that area. The Fire Department has trained personnel who are similar to paramedics in the USA. They are qualified for emergency treatment and can transport a sick or injured person. In a medical emergency, you may also call SAMU, “Service d’Aide Médicale d’Urgence”, (Urgent Medical Aide/Ambulance Service) by dialing 15.

Emergency phone numbers

The quickest way to get help in any emergency is to pick up the telephone and DIAL 18. In a medical emergency, to call SAMU, “Service d’Aide Médicale d’Urgence”, (Urgent Medical Aide/Ambulance Service) DIAL 15.

Fire Department and Rescue (Pompiers) 18
Police (Gendarmarie Nationale) 17
Ambulance (SAMU) 15
Doctor – Emergency (SAMU) 15
Doctor-Emergency (S.O.S. Medicins) 05 61 33 00 00
Emergencies – Toulouse East – CHU Rangueil, 1 ave Jean Poulhes 05 61 32 27 95
Emergencies – Toulouse West – CHU Purpan, place Dr. Baylac 05 61 77 23 58
Emergencies – Children – Hopital des Enfants (CHU Purpan) Entrance: 330 ave Grande Bretagne, Toulouse 05 34 55 84 10
Emergencies & Weekend – Children – Clinique Cours Dillon (near Prairie des Filtres), 1 rue de Peyrolade, Toulouse 05 62 13 28 28

 

European Emergency 112
Anti-Poison Center (Centre Anti-poison), Purpan 05 61 77 74 47
Burn Center – Adults (Grands brules adultes), CHU Rangueil, 1 avenue Jean Poulhes, Toulouse 05 61 32 27 43
Burn Center – Children (Grands brules enfants), CHU Purpan, Place Dr. Baylac, Toulouse 05 34 55 84 72
Crisis Center (in French) 05 61 80 80 80
Heart Attack (SOS Infarctus), CHU Rangueil, 1 ave Jean Poulhes, Toulouse EAST 05 61 32 26 10
Heart Attack (SOS Infarctus). CHU Purpan, Place Dr. Baylac, Toulouse WEST 05 61 77 21 36
Severd Limbs (SOS Mains), CHU Purpan, Place Dr. Baylac, Toulouse 05 61 77 21 43

 

Night Pharmacy: Open 20:00 – 8:00, 70 allees Jean Jaures, Toulouse (near Place Wilson, entrance rue Arnaud Vidal) 05 61 62 38 05
Electricity (EDF) 08 10 13 14 33
Gas (GDF) 08 10 13 13 33
24-hour Locksmith (Serrurier de Garde) – Be careful of billing! Ask always before the service is performed! 05 61 47 61 63
Emergency Vet: after 19:00 05 61 50 10 80

Pediatric Emergency Services Clinic
Clinique Cours Dillon has a pediatrician on the premises available for all emergencies on weekends (from Saturday to Monday mornings). In case of emergency, x-rays and lab work can be done on site. Emergency surgery is also possible and/or directed to a different institution if necessary.

Clinique Cours Dillon, 1 rue Peyrolade, 31300 Toulouse (Tel: 05 62 13 28 28)

Children vaccinations

Children’s vaccinations are administered at a doctor’s office. A prescription will be given and you will be expected to bring the vaccine to the next appointment. (To avoid the need for a second appointment, some pediatricians keep vaccines in stock. In such cases, a prescription will be given and you will be expected to replace the vaccine used during the visit.) Vaccinations are recorded in the child’s Carnet de Santé (Medical Record) which is usually requested by the doctor for each visit. (See “Carnet de Santé” further in this chapter.)

Vaccination Abbreviations
BCG: Bacille Calmette et Guérin (tuberculosis)
C: Coqueluche (Whooping Cough)
DTCP: Diphtérie-Tétanos-Coqueluche-Poliomyélite (Diptheria-Tetanus-Whooping Cough-Polio)
DTP: Diphtérie-Tétanos-Poliomyélite (Diptheria-Tetanus-Polio)
HépB: Hépatite B (Hepatitus B)
Hib: Haemophilus influenzae b.
O: Oreillons (Mumps)
ROR: Rougeole-Oreillons-Rubéole (Measles-Mumps-Rubella)
R: Rubéole (Rubella)
TP: Tétanos-Poliomyélite (Tetanus-Polio)

Vaccination Schedule

From 1 month
  • BCG (only if there is possibility of exposure from someone within the immediate family)
From 2 months
  • DTCP (now combined DTCP+Hib commonly given)
  • Hep B (recommended)

First injection (premiere injection)

From 3 months(1 month after 1st injection)
  • DTCP (now combined DTCP+Hib commonly given)
  • Hep B (recommended)

Second injection (deuxieme injection)

From 4 months(1 month after 2nd injection)
  • DTCP (now combined DTCP+Hib commonly given)
  • HepB (recommended)

Third injection (troisieme injection)

12 – 15 Months
  • ROR (optional, but recommended)

*Rougeole alone at 9 months if child is in daycare with ROR to be given six months later

First vaccination

12 – 18 months
  • DTCP (now combined DTCP+Hib commonly given)
  • HepB (recommended)

First booster (premier rappel)

5 – 6 years(or before if requred by school)
  • DTP (C boosters no longer required)
  • HepB (recommended every five years thereafter)

Second booster (deuxieme rappel)

  • ROR (optional, but recommended)

Second vaccination (deuxieme dose)

Before 6 years(when child enters group environment)
  • BCG (required for entry ‘en collective”)
From 6 years(or before ir required by school)
  • Epreuve tuberculinique (tuberculin test) followed by BCG if negative
11 -13 years
  • DTP (C boosters no longer required)

Third booster (troisieme rappel)

  • ROR (booster required in vaccinated chldren)
  • HepB (booster only if series received in infancy, complete series of three if not)
  • O (for all boys who did not have ROR and who have not yet had mumps)
  • R (for all girls who did not have ROR)
  • Epreuve tuberculinique (tuberculine test) followes by BCG if negative
16 – 18 years
  • DTP (C boosters no loner required at this age)

Fourth booster (quatrieme rappel)

  • R (for all girls who did not have ROR)
  • Epreuve tuberculinique (tuberculin test) followed by BCG if negative
Over 18 years
  • TP (every 10 years)

Vaccin BCG et épreuve tuberculinique (Tuberculosis vaccine and test)

BCG vaccination is required for entry en collectivité (daycare, school, vacation camp, etc.). In the French school system, vaccination is compulsory before the age of six. At certain times, children must undergo an épreuve tuberculinique (tuberculin test) to confirm that they continue to be protected.
• Monovax, the vaccine, is given once (unless a tuberculin test yields a negative result, requiring re-vaccination). It must be administered before the child is allowed to enter any group environment, (daycare, school, vacation camp), and is verified every two years during childhood with a tuberculin test.
• Monotest, a prick test, verifies that the Monovax was effective. It is similar to a tine test. If redness or a raised area appears, the test is positive and nothing more is required at that time. If there is no localized reaction, the Monotest is considered negative, and a second, more precise test is done. If the second test is also negative, the child will probably be re-vaccinated.

NOTE: BCG vaccination will result in a positive result for the TB test for the rest of the child’s life. When returning to your home country, it will be necessary to explain that the vaccine was compulsory in France. It is highly recommended that you obtain a medical certificate from your French doctor stating the child was vaccinated and explaining that the lifelong positive reaction is induced by antibodies and not by the disease itself. This certificate should be kept with the child’s permanent records, as TB testing in adulthood is common for certain professions (military service, education, health care, etc.).

Medical Record Book (Carnet de Santé)

A Carnet de Santé is issued by the Service de Protection Maternelle et Infantile for all children born in France. It serves as a complete medical record for children until the age of 16, and includes space for medical professionals to mark and certify vaccinations, doctors’ visits, illnesses, accidents, as well as growth charts and a dental record. Photocopies of the pages containing vaccination information is considered proof of vaccination.

The Sécurité Sociale issues another type of Carnet de Santé to anyone over the age of 16 that is covered by the French National Health Care system. It was intended to provide the same type of medical record for adults as was possible with the pediatric carnet mentioned above. However, in practice, it is not widely used, as people do not like the idea that all of their medical history be so readily available. In theory, the patient is expected to present the Carnet de Santé during doctor or hospital visits. The date and nature of the visit as well as any treatments or analyses that have been performed are noted. The treating physician then stamps and signs the entry. Only with the patient’s consent, the treating physician may indicate any remarks or comments that they feel appropriate. Only with the patient’s consent, dentists, pharmacists and other medical professionals may consult the carnet and indicate any remarks or comments that they feel appropriate.

Medical treatment forms (Feulle de soins)

The Carte Vitale serves as an electronically transmitted feuille de soins (medical treatment form). Medical services (i.e. doctors’ visits) require payment at the time the service is rendered. Those who are covered 100% for medications will have nothing to pay at the pharmacy if the card, or the information it contains, is provided when purchasing reimbursable prescription medications and if tiers payant is requested. (If not in possession of either the card or the information necessary for automatic coverage at the time of purchase, you must pay the full costs of the prescribed items and submit the paperwork for reimbursement yourself.) If you would prefer to have a receipt for an electronic transaction, a facture (invoice) or ticket (receipt) could be requested as a proof of payment.

If the medical provider or pharmacy is not connected to the Sésam-Vitale computer system, or if you are not covered by the Sécurité Sociale, an paper-copy feuille de soins will be provided for you to submit where necessary for reimbursement. The feuille de soins states the nature of the service (in code), name and registration number of the doctor, amount paid for services rendered and prescription information. The prescription(ordonnance) will be written on a separate paper, usually in duplicate.

The feuille de soins issued by the doctor should be given to the pharmacist when having prescriptions filled. (They will provide a separate feuille de soins to record the purchase of medications, if necessary.) The pharmacist will stamp the prescription, the duplicate, and the feuille de soins, then fill out the appropriate prescription information. When using the manual method with the paper feuille de soins, the vignette (sticker) on each package of re-imbursable prescribed medication will be removed and placed on the form. Payment for medications must be made when they are provided, unless the person for whom the prescription is written is covered by the Sécurité Sociale.

Complete the feuille de soins with your personal information, sign it and send it along with a duplicate of any prescriptions to the CPAM – Caisse Primaire d’Assurance Maladie (Sécurité Sociale center) assigned to you by the Sécurité Sociale or to your insurance company for reimbursement. If submitting the medical expenses for reimbursement by an insurance company outside of France, remember to recalculate the fees in the insurance company’s local currency using the exchange rate in effect on the date that the expenses were incurred. (For additional information, see “Doctors”, “Pharmacies and Pharmacists-Reimbursement of Medication Costs”, and “Sécurité Sociale” in this chapter.)

The feuille de soins must be submitted to the Sécurité Sociale for reimbursement within 2 years of the date of the medical expense. If the feuille de soins is lost, a duplicata (duplicate) can be requested between 15 and 90 days following the date indicated on the original.

Prior Agreement Form (Entente préalable)

If a doctor feels the patient needs additional treatment (therapist, chiropractor, etc.), the patient will be given an entente préalable form that requests agreement from the Sécurité Sociale prior to treatment. Complete the entente préalable with your personal information (if not already indicated) and send it to the CPAM – Caisse Primaire d’Assurance Maladie (Sécurité Sociale center) assigned to you by the Sécurité Sociale. If no refusal has been received within two weeks, one can consider the agreement as effective. After treatment and payment, the patient will receive another form to be submitted to the CPAM.

French National Health Care (Sécurité Sociale)

Anyone covered by the Sécurité Sociale (French National Health Care service) must pay cash for any medical expense incurred while travelling abroad, then, upon returning to France, submit the receipts to the CPAM – Caisse Primaire d’Assurance Maladie (Sécurité Sociale center) assigned to them by the Sécurité Sociale for reimbursement. If care was received in a country that does not use the euro as its currency, remember to recalculate the fees in euros using the exchange rate in effect on the date that the expenses were incurred.

French Government Social Services
The main branches of French government social services relating to the majority of expatriates are:
Sécurité Sociale (French National Health Care system)
Retraite (Retirement)
Chômage (Unemployment)
Allocations Familiales (Family Allowances)

Employers, employees, and the State pay for these services. Anyone working for a French employer under a French contract being remunerated in euros can be eligible for these benefits. Those working for a non-French company may or may not be eligible; check with your employer. Self-employed persons must pay for these services themselves, which is similar to the “meet-and-match” system for American Social Security coverage in the USA for the self-employed. Despite the higher cost for the self-employed, the benefits received are greatly reduced in comparison with salaried workers. The ANPE (State Unemployment Agency) registers all unemployed people in France and offers employment counseling, employment listings and information on training programs.

Special Forms for European Union nationals (Forms E111 and E112)
EEC/European Union nationals must supply a completed form E111 in order to be hospitalized in France in case of emergency, and the hospitalization costs will be paid directly by your insurance. For any external treatments, you must pay for the costs and be reimbursed by your insurance.

For non-emergency treatments in France (i.e. when the home country cannot provide treatment or when waiting lists are too long) a completed form E112 must be provided. Tourists are urged to take out a special travel assistance insurance that contains repatriation coverage for returning home and for hospitalization. One source for this type of insurance is Europ Assistance, 1 promenade de la Bonnette, 92230 GENNEVILLIERS (Tel: 01 41 85 85 85).

Eligibility for Sécurité Sociale

Healthcare coverage is obligatory for all wage earners. Some countries have an agreement with France making their citizens eligible for French benefits while others do not. Check with your employer to determine if you are eligible for these benefits. In order to be affiliated with the Sécurité Sociale, you or your employer must file an official declaration at the local CPAM – Caisse Primaire d’Assurance Maladie (Sécurité Sociale center) or at the Toulouse office:

• CPAM – Caisse Primaire d’Assurance Maladie de la Haute-Garonne
Guichet International No. 3
3 boulevard Léopold Escande
31000 TOULOUSE
(Tel: 05 62 73 80 00)

Many employees on temporary assignment with an American or other non French company are not eligible for coverage by the Sécurité Sociale and should obtain insurance and appropriate forms from their home country. Employees whose company does not provide a direct payment insurance system must pay for any French expenses directly and file a claim to the insurance company in the home country for reimbursement. Remember to recalculate the fees in the insurance company’s local currency using the exchange rate in effect on the date that the expenses were incurred.

Those granted coverage by the Sécurité Sociale will be issued a numéro d’immatriculation (Sécurité Sociale number) to be used on all medical forms, a Carnet de Santé (Medical Record Book) and a Carte Vitale (medical smartcard). (See “Feuille de soins”, “Carnet de Santé” and “Carte Vitale” in this chapter.)

Registering for coverage with the Sécurité Sociale

• Wage Earners: The employer makes an official declaration CPAM – Caisse Primaire d’Assurance Maladie and URSSAF (Family Benefits). The employee receives a numéro d’immatriculation (Sécurité Sociale number) to be used on all medical forms, a Carnet de Santé (Medical Record Book) and a Carte Vitale (medical smartcard). The wage earner’s unemployed spouse and dependents are also covered. Approximately 20% of the cost of coverage is deducted directly from the wage earner’s salary. The employer pays 70% of the employee’s salary to the government towards the same benefits. All wage earners pay a Contribution Sociale Géneralisée – CSG (solidarity tax) to help support financially the French National Health Care system, whether or not they are eligible for national health coverage. Those not eligible for coverage pay a smaller percentage of their salary than that paid by those who are eligible.

• Self-Employed (Non-Wage Earners): Self-employed workers must take out a voluntary health insurance policy within 6 months of arriving in France. A list of insurance companies who work with the Sécurité Sociale can be obtained through the Chamber of Trade. A self-employed person is also required to pay for pension programs and family benefits. As some of these costs are fixed, one must be sure to have a large enough income to cover the expense. Reimbursement rates for medical expenses are much lower than for wage earners covered directly by the Sécurité Sociale.

• Students Under 26 Years of Age: If you or a member of your family is a non-minor student under 26 years of age, contact  the following office for more information about special rates: La Mutuelle des Etudiants, 54 rue Bayard, Toulouse, (Tel: 05 62 73 53 43)

Carte Vitale (Medical Smartcard)

Individuals covered by the Sécurité Sociale are issued a Carte Vitale (medical smartcard) whose chip is programmed with the names of those covered, their address, the duration of coverage, the numéro d’immatriculation (Sécurité Sociale number) and mutuelle information. NOTE: The document that is provided with the Carte Vitale should always be readily available in case a doctor is not connected to the Sésam-Vitale network and must enter the information manually. (Although under normal circumstances hospitals and clinics will be able to access the information with theSésam-Vitale computer network using only the name of the person covered, it is always best to be well prepared to avoid being required to advance what might be a large sum of money.)

The Carte Vitale was introduced in order to reduce paperwork and serves as an electronically transmitted feuille de soins (medical treatment form). Those who are covered 100% for medication will have nothing to pay if the card, or the information it contains, is provided when purchasing reimbursable prescription medications. However, most medical services (i.e. doctors’ visits) still require payment at the time the service is rendered. If you would prefer to have a receipt for the transaction, a facture (invoice) or ticket (receipt) can be requested as a proof of payment. Feuilles de soins are still provided for anyone who does not have a Carte Vitale.

Supplementary Mutualized Insurance (Assurance Mutuelle)
Because the Sécurité Sociale does not reimburse all health expenses, it is common to cover the additional expense through a mutuelle (supplementary insurance). Check with your employer to find out if they have special coverage rates with a particular insurance company and offer this additional coverage to their employees. A Mutuelle will cover all or part of extra expenses such as visits to specialists, re-imbursable prescribed medication, hospitalization, dentists, and opticians. If your Mutuelle information is not included on your Carte Vitale or has not been provided to theSécurité Sociale, the document received from the Sécurité Sociale notifying you that reimbursement has been made must be sent to your mutuelle for reimbursement of the remaining portion of the expense.

While some insurance premiums may be deducted from French income tax, health costs that you pay yourself are not deductible.

RATES OF REIMBURSEMENT

35 %
  • Medication considered not to be of vital necessity (the vignette will be blue)
60 %
  • Health Care professionals’ fees (nurses, physical therapists, etc.)
  • Lab Work
65 %
  • Common Medications
  • Common vaccinations (diptheria, hepB, Haemophilus ingluenzaeB, polio, tetanus, tuberculosis, whooping cough
  • Transportation to a hospital
  • Orthopedic prostheses, accessories, bandages
  • Eyeglasses: lenses only if 16 or over, lenses and frames for under 16 (contacts lenses not covered)
70 %
  • Doctors’ and dentists’ fees at the fixed rate for Medecins Conventionnes Secteur 1
80 %
  • Hospitalization in a hopital or clinique conventionnee (not covered is a minimum daily rate of 10.67 Euros charged to the patient, reimbursable by certain mutuelles)
100 %
  • Vital of costly medicine
  • Costly orthopedic prostheses
  • ROR vaccinations (MMR)
  • Flu vaccination for anyone over 70
  • Hospitalization for surgery requiring general anesthesia when performed in a hopital or clinique conventionnee (not covered is a minimum daily charge to patient)
  • Hospitalization from the 31st day for stays of more than 30 days in a hopital or clinique conventionnee (not covered is minimum daily charge to patient)
  • Any costly hospitalization in a hopital or clinique conventionnee (not covered is minimum daily charge to patient)
  • Treatment for a longterm illness recognized by the Securite Sociale
  • Treatment for work-related accidents
  • Diagnosis and treatment for sterility
  • Pregnancy: all examinations from the 6th month of pregnancy, hospital fees incurred during delivery, any care of the mother or infant during the 30 days following birth, all care and treatment of premature babies
  • HIV and hepatitus C testing
  • Examinations necessary to determine if the patient suffers from an incurable disease
  • Care of a minor following rape or other sexual assault punishable by law

Vocabulary – Medical – Symptoms/Conditions
I have…………………………………………………………………. J’ai …
…chest pain …………………………………………………… J’ai mal à la poitrine
…fever ………………………………………………………… J’ai de la fièvre
…the shivers …………………………………………………. J’ai des frissons
…a sore throat / tonsilitis ……………………………….. J’ai mal a la gorge / j’ai une angine
…a cold ……………………………………………………….. Je suis enrhumé
…the flu ……………………………………………………….. J’ai la grippe
…a headache ………………………………………………… J’ai mal à la tête
…a migraine …………………………………………………. J’ai une migraine
…a back ache ………………………………………………. J’ai mal au dos
…a stomach ache ………………………………………….. J’ai mal au ventre
…an earache ……………………………………………….. J’ai mal à l’oreille
…indigestion ………………………………………………. J’ai une indigestion
…a toothache ……………………………………………… J’ai mal aux dents
…diarrhea …………………………………………………… J’ai la diarrhée
…a skin rash ………………………………………………. J’ai une éruption sur la peau

I am ………………………………………………………………….. Je suis… or J’ai… (variable)
…in pain ………………………………………………………. J’ai mal
…exhausted ……………………………………………….. Je suis épuisé(e)
…diabetic ………………………………………………….. J’ai le diabète
…injured ……………………………………………………… Je suis blessé
…out of breath ……………………………………………… Je suis éssoufflé(e)
…nauseated ……………………………………………….. J’ai de la nausée
…dizzy ………………………………………………………. J’ai le vertige

I don’t feel well ………………………………………………… J’ai un malaise
I feel sick ……………………………………………………….. J’ai des nausées / J’ai mal au cœur (not to be confused with chest pain)
I feel faint ………………………………………………………… J’ai la tête qui tourne
I’m sweating ……………………………………………………. Je transpire
I think it’s broken ………………………………………………. Je pense que c’est cassé
That hurts ……………………………………………………….. Ça me fait mal
That is very painful…………………………………………….. C’est très douloureux
Bruise …………………………………………………………….. Un bleu, une contusion, un hématome
To be bruised …………………………………………………… Être couvert de bleus
Burning sensation ……………………………………………. Sensation de chaleur, douleur cuisante
Burn ……………………………………………………………… Une brûlure
That itches ………………………………………………………. Ça me démange
Sore ……………………………………………………………….. Endolori
Aching ……………………………………………………………. Douloureux
Sharp pain ……………………………………………………… Douleur aigüe
Ulcer ………………………………………………………………. Ulcère
Tender ………………………………………………………….. Sensible
Swollen ………………………………………………………….. Enflé
Swelling bump …………………………………………………. Une bosse
To cough / a cough ………………………………………….. Tousser / une toux

Medications – General vocabulary

Prescription ………………………………………………… Ordonnance
Medication ………………………………………………….. Médicament
Dosage …………………………………………………….. Posologie
Directions for use ………………………………………. Mode d’emploi
Side effects …………………………………………….. Effets secondaires
By mouth, to be taken orally ………………………… Voie orale
Ailments treated by product …………………………. Indications thérapeutiques
Warnings …………………………………………………. Mise en garde
Tablets or pills ………………………………………….. Comprimés
Tablets, chewable ……………………………………….. Cachets à sucer or cachets à croquer
Tablets, to be swallowed …………………………….. Cachets à avaler
Tablets, to be dissolved in water ……………………. Comprimés à dissoudre
Drops ……………………………………………………… Gouttes
Teaspoon (5 ml.) ……………………………………….. Cuillère à café (5 ml.)
Tablespoon (20 ml.) …………………………………….. Cuillère à soupe (20 ml.)
Small packets of powder …………………………….. Sachets
Powder …………………………………………………… Poudre
Do not exceed prescribed dosage …………………. Ne pas dépasser la dose prescrite
Lip cream ………………………………………………….. Baume à lèvres
Vitamins …………………………………………………… Vitamines
Adhesive tape ………………………………………… Sparadrap
Band-Aids ……………………………………………….. Pansements
Gauze ……………………………………………………. Gaze
Baking soda ………………………………………………. Bicarbonate de soude
Tartaric acid …………………………………………… Acide tartrique
Cream of tartar …………………………………………. Crème de tartre

Medications for Children

Upset Stomach Isptonyl betaine, Spaxfon
Diarrhea Bismupar, Ercefuryl, Smecta
Constipation Enterospasmyl, Ducolax, Fructines Vichy
Headache Upsa aspirine, Migralgine, Aspegic, Doliprane (paracetamol)
Menstrual Cramps Migralgine, ADvil
Toothache Migralgine
Flu Anti-grippe or Cequinyl, Actifed
Cough drops Vicks, Drill, Strepsils
Back or muscular aches Baume de tigre, Lao-dal, Baune Aroma, Decontractyl, Algipan
Mosquito repellent Dolmix pic or citronelle
Mercurochrome Mercurochrome
Antiseptic solutions Mercryl lauryle, teinture merfene
Shampoo for dandruff Hegor, Ultrex

Hospital Stay

Are you covered by Sécurité Sociale? ……………………………………….. Etes-vous pris(e) en charge?
Do you have complementary French insurance? …………………………. Avez-vous une mutuelle?
I have an E111 form …………………………………………………………………. J’ai la fiche E-cent-onze
I have an E112 form ………………………………………………………………… J’ai la fiche E-cent-douze
Here is the contact information for my insurance ………………………… Voici les coordonnées de ma compagnie d’assurance
Blood type/group ……………………………………………………………………. Groupe sanguin
Medical history – prior illness …………………………………………………….. Des antécédents médicaux?
Medical history – prior surgery …………………………………………………. Des antécédents chirurgicaux?
Medical history – allergies ……………………………………………………….. Des allergies? or Etes-vous allergique?
Medical history – current treatment or medications ……………………… Quel est votre traitement actuel?or …courant? or …en cours?

Medical history – medications ……………………………………………………. Quels médicaments prenez-vous actuellement?
Do you have a special diet? …………………………………………………….. Avez-vous un régime spécial?
…salt-free/without salt …………………………………….. sans sel
…sugar-free/without sugar ………………………………… sans sucre
…gluten-free/without gluten ………………………………. sans gluten
Do not get up ………………………………………………………………………… Ne pas se lever or Restez allongé
Get undressed …………………………………………………………………….. Déshabillez-vous
I feel sick …………………………………………………………………………….. J’ai envie de vomir or J’ai mal au cœur
I need a bedpan ……………………………………………………………………… J’ai besoin d’un bassin
I need to go to the toilet/I need to go pee ………………………………….. Je veux aller au toilettes/Je veux faire pipi
I have pain ……………………………………………………………………………. J’ai mal
I have gas/wind …………………………………………………………………….. J’ai des gaz
I feel sick ………………………………………………………………………… Je me sens malade
I’m hungry …………………………………………………………………………….. J’ai faim
I’m thirsty ……………………………………………………………………………… J’ai soif
I’m bleeding …………………………………………………………………………. Je saigne
That’s too tight ……………………………………………………………………… C’est trop serré
That’s too loose …………………………………………………………………… Ce n’est pas assez serré

ENGLISH-SPEAKING DOCTORS

NOTE: This listing of doctors and medical practioners is for information only. RECOMMENDATIONS ARE NOT INTENDED.

[In order to find the physcal location of any practitioner listed below, simply type their name and city into the Pages Jaunes (Yellow Pages) and their office on a map will show up.]

Note also that the AIT I/C has been informed that the CHU Purpan has a service that any doctor practicing at the hospital may contact to arrange for consultation translation into English.

Anesthesiologists (anesthésiste)

Dr. ALACOQUE Xavier, Hopital Purpan, 1 place du Dr BAYLAC, TOULOUSE, Tel: 05 67 77 12 00 .

mailto: alacoque.x@chu-toulouse.fr

Dr. Dominique Hornus DRAGNE, Clinique Cours Dillon, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 62 13 28 28

Dr. Bernard ELBEZE, Nouvelle Clinique de l’Union, Blvd. Ratalens, SAINT JEAN Tel: 05 61 37 87 70

Cardiologists (cardiologues)

Dr. Phillipe Vigreux, 32 rue Alsace Lorraine, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 34 45 06 45

Unite de Cardiologie Interventionnelle Clinique Pasteur
Dr. Jean Fajadet – Tel: 05 62 21 16 99
45 avenue de Lombez, TOULOUSE

Chiropractors (chiropracteurs)

Quentin Guyot, Chriopractor, 63 Allée du Rouergue near the veterinarian clinic), 31770 COLOMIERS Tel: 06 75 95 45 67

Amy de Traversay, B.Sc., D.C. 120 rue de Bourrelier, MERVILLE Tel: 05 34 52 23 92

Dentists (dentistes)

Dr. Nicole Garbarsky, 45 allees Jean Jaures, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 62 30 58

Dr. Boisvert, 58 rue de Metz, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 25 77 00

Dr. Guy Brouquières , 4 place Roger Salengro, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 21 83 98

Dr. Malevre or Regis or Meulewater, Rte. de Seilh, AUSSONE Tel: 05 61 85 14 19

Dr. Simon, 24 rue Freres, PIBRAC Tel: 05 61 06 56 56

Dr. Bruno Treil, route de Grenade, L’ISLE-JOURDAIN, Tel: 05.62.62.21.64

Dentist & Orthodontist (orthodontistes)

Dr. Maxime Rotenberg, 12 rue Louise Brailee, RAMONVILLE ST.AGNE Tel: 05 62 17 50 50

Dr. Pierre FENECH, 2 Ave. Frizac,, 31400 Toulouse, Tel: 05 61 52 39 04 (Member, American Odontologist Association)

Dermatologists (dermatologues)

Dr. Paul Touron, 47 allee Rouergue, COLOMIERS Tel: 05 61 30 20 33

Ear-Nose-Throat / ENT (Oto-Rhino-Laringologiste / ORL)

Prof. Bernard Fraysse, CHU Purpan – Clinique Dieufoy, TOULOUSE (difficult cases, deafness) Tel: 05 61 77 24 01

Dr. Eli Yardeni, Clinique Sarrus Teinturieres, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 77 33 11

Endocrinologist (endocrinologues)

Dr. Nathalie Saboe de Montrion, 2 rue Sports, COLOMIERS Tel: 05 61 30 19 71

General Practitioners (médecins généralistes)

Dr. Patrick Lachapele, 29 ave. Yser 32000, AUCH, Tel: 05 62 05 11 26

Dr. Diamant or Garcia, 1 rue Pigeonnier, 31490 Brax, Tel: 06.15.56.88.42 / 05 61 86 60 74

Dr Monique Faure, La Villanelle, Route de Toulouse , 31700, CORNEBARRIEU, Tel: 05 61 85 41 46

Dr. Jean Abecassis, 3 rue des Lois, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 21 69 77 (affections chronique)

Dr. Chantal Boivin-Kheirat, Route de Toulouse, CORNEBARRIEU Tel: 05 61 85 76 33

Dr. Emile Escourrou, 59 rue de la Providence, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 80 01 23

Dr. Laurent, 88 rte. de Grenade, BLAGNAC Tel: 05 62 48 62 48 (long waiting list)

Dr. Arnault Gruber, 7 rue d’Auch, COLOMIERS Tel: 05 61 30 28 88

Dr. Tan Liem Dang, 5 pl de Provence, VILLENEUVE-TOLOSANE Tel: 06 11 20 28 43

Dr. Pierre Forte, 22 av Tolosane, RAMONVILLE ST. AGNE Tel: 05 61 73 30 49 (1 day a week only)

Dr. Gerald Galtier, 1 rue Dominique Ingrès, BLAGNAC Tel: 05 61 30 08 61

Dr. Hervé Lieberfreund, 275 route de Seysses, Bâtiment B 15, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 40 63 25

Dr. Pierre Khalifa, 67 rue Alsace Lorraine, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 21 03 83

Dr. Jacques Palusci, 40 bd Silvio Trentin, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 47 86 27

Dr. Christian Philis, 42 rue Bernard Ortet, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 48 71 37

Dr. Michel Raby, 4 bd Vincent Auriol, TOURNEFEUILLE Tel 05 61 07 06 06

Dr. Fredeirc Sana, 4 bd Vincent Auriol, TOURNEFEUILLE Tel 05 61 07 06 06

Dr. Hugues Sztulman, 27 bd de Strasbourg, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 21 79 90

Cancer/Breast Problems (cancérologues / oncologues)

Institut Universitaire du cancer Toulouse Oncopole Tel: 05 31 15 50 50

Obstetrician-Gynecologist / OB-GYN (obstétricien-gynécologues)

Dr. Francois Finkeltin, Clinique Saint Jean Languedoc, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 54 90 30

Dr. Popovic ou Landman, 25 blvrd de Strasbourg TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 21 65 58

Dr. Annie Robinet-Lambarte, 237 rue G. Doumergue, TOURNEFEUILLE Tel: 05 61 86 86 22

Dr Thomas Landman, Clinique Ambrose Pare, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 50 16 88 e-mail drlandman@hotmail.com

Obstetricians (obstétriciens)

Dr. Guillaume Kobuch, Clinique Ambrose Pare, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 50 15 74

Opthalmologists (ophtalmologistes)

Dr. Marie Pailles Berthier, 30 rue d’Auch, COLOMIERS Tel: 05 61 30 22 30

Dr. Jean-Loup Delfour, Clinique Saint Jean, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 54 90 75

Dr. Yves Galiacy, 21-23 allées du Lauragais, COLOMIERS Tel: 05 61 16 44 88

Pediatricians (pédiatres)

Dr. Jacky Marco-Prunet, 11 rue Delpech, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 52 15 19

Dr. Jean Barthet, Centre Pédiatrique, 12 rue Sarraziniere, BLAGNAC Tel: 05 61 71 41 11

Dr. François Paucot, Clinique Sarrus Teinturiers, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 67 77 51 31

Physiotherapist (kinésithérapeutes / kinés)

Dr. Jacques Seignan, 12 av Bouscane, LEGUEVIN Tel: 05 61 86 38 30

Nadia Van Tintelen, 1 chemin de Percin, SEILH Tel: 06 26 95 55 25 nadia_vantintelen@hotmail.com

Plastic Surgery (chirurgie esthétique)

Dr. Jacques Saboye , 54 allée des Demoiselles, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 53 80 80

Podiatrists (pedicures-podologues)

Jean-Vincent Igarza, 28 rue du Dr Matéo, CASTELGINEST Tel: 05 61 70 49 79

Psychiatrists (psychiatres)

Dr. Serge Boubli, 73 rue Alsace Lorraine, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 21 28 82

Dr. B. Auriol, 5 impasse Blanchard, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 25 26 27

Psychotherapists (psychothérapeutes) / Psychologists (psychologues)

Stacey Callahan, Paris and Toulouse member AFTCC Tel: 06.60.19.81.59

Pierry Lamy, Centre médical La Villanelle, CORNEBARRIEU Tél. : 05 34 52 94 19

Isabelle Daudy, M.A., 4 rue Job, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 62 74 63

Violaine Pillet, Clinical Psychologist and Therapist, 26 rue Ingrès, 31000 TOULOUSE Tel: 06 22 72 05 36

Sylvie Cazaux, Clinical Psychologist and Psychotherapist (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy), bilingual English/French; chlidren, adolescents, adults, couples and families; 3 Allée de la Corrèze 31770 Colomiers; T: 0672743533 (mobile)

Deborah de Camaret, Clinical Psychologist, Marriage, Family Therapist, bilingual English/French; 20, quai de Tounis, 31000 Toulouse; T : 05 31 54 12 91 or 06 28 06 79 34.

Lena Mathez; Clinical psychologist and psychotherapist (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy)
Address: 26 rue Volta, 31000 Toulouse; T: 43 75 76 44
Website: www.lenamathez.fr and E-mail: lena.mathez@orange.fr

lists English-speaking counselors and therapists in France:  www.counsellinginfrance.com
and, Toulouse:  http://www.thecarenetworkmp.com/

Neuro-Psychiatrists (neuropsychiatres)

Dr. Serge Gonzales , 93 bd Déodat de Sevrac, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 59 88 88

Child Psychiatrists (pédopsychiatres)

Dr. Chabrol, 21 av Alsace Lorraine, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 22 52 90

Note: What is the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist?  A psychiatrist is a doctor, he/she can prescribe drugs, make a diagnosis and use therapeutic tools he/she has been trained for.  A psychologist is qualified to do testing and has extra training in different therapeutic orientations.The latter can perform both psychological and educational tests to make clinical judgments, write up evaluations, etc….  There are many different type of therapies, it is important you choose the right one for your problematic with a practinioner you trust most and feel comfortable with. It is a very individual process.

Radiologists (radiologues)

Dr. Jean Nabonne, Clinique Medipole Garonne, 45 rue de Gironis, TOULOUSE Tel: 05 61 51 99 78

Dr. Pierre Dunglas, Clinique Monié route de Revel, Villefranche du Lauragais, Tel: 05 62 71 77 66

Surgeons (chirurgiens)

Dr. Nicolas Fouilleron, Clinique de l’Union, L’UNION; Tel: 05 61 37 87 22 (orthopedique and traumatologique)


Medication for Adults (to be employed ONLY under a doctor’s guidance)

Anti-Inflammatory Nifluryl
Burns (or sunburn) Biafine cream
Children’s Aspirin Aspegic, Catalgine
Children’s Paracetamol or Acetaminophen Doliprane, Dafalgan
Children’s Ibuprofen Advil (liquid)
Colds Vicks VapoRub
Cough Syrup Rhinatiol
Cough Suppressant Mucitux suppositoires
Constipation Suppositoires glycerines
Car Sickness Chloranantine, dramamine
Diarrhea Ercefuryl (liquid or tablets), Smecta
Iodine Betadine
Rashes Nisapulvol, Deflamol, Eosine acqueuse
Throat Lozenges Lysopaine
Ointment for Insect Bites Quotane, Parfenac